Monsters show how tool watches can be economic both in design and construction without compromising on performance and robustness.

Seiko Monster Automatic Divers SRP311K1Purists often frown upon the very freedom the Monster has owned - its free access to almost any setting – but its escapade from the bounds of tradition started a whole new tradition itself! Diver and Monster are kind of synonymous today; others try to borrow as much from the Monster as possible. This keeps their costs low, maintenance negligible and a lasting equivalent to a rock of its size. However, others do not match the monster performance, despite its not-so-pretty-and-glamorous movement.

Monsters show how tool watches can be economic both in design and construction without compromising on performance and robustness. Their minimal cost strips them off any decorative pretense (some call it fineness) but keeps the striking presence to take it anywhere (save the ball- and the boardroom), not just the sea. This is the reason the Seiko Monster could hold its edge this long; over the years, their prices fluctuated negligibly and whenever it went up, it brought something new! Like the new Seiko Monster unleashed in the 2014, but since it’s all about exclusivity, we’ll talk about it after a little while. Let’s talk about a not-so-new Seiko Monster first.

The Seiko dive watches Scuba took the Monster series up a notch; it’s one of the best automatics Seiko ever made within this price range. Its unique design makes it perfect also for places where situation demands both style and quality; the solid stainless steel assures you will never be out of place. Cool, colorful and masculine; after a long time the archaic Orange Monster faces a worthy opponent.

However, Baselworld 2014 was all about Seiko’s Prospex line of two new Monsters for the outside market: the Prospex Air-Diver 200 m Monster (same specs as other Monsters; a hackable, hand-wind/auto 4R36 movement with 41-hours of power reserve and a new Prospex logo) in two variations: the SRP581K1 (black case, blue bezel and minute hand; black rubber strap) and the SRP583K1 (black case and bezel; gold hands and crown; black steel bracelet). These are Premium Monsters standing at 42.3 mm (across) and sporting signature large, luminous, shark-tooth hour markers and luminous hour and minute hands, the seconds-hand with lume also on the tip.These come in Seiko’s proprietary Hardlex (the crystal) with near-sapphire hardness but less likely to shatter like one.

But Trek Monster locks its horns well with the Seiko chrono. These moved from the waters to the land and contends well for the iconic title.

An unusual, distinctive design that stands on the verge of being ugly and aggresive, but none can perhaps call it blunt-edged; it’s impressively sharp, thanks to its scalloped bezel and hands.But if you want something that’s really unusual, go for the limited edition Night Monsters.

Share It!

Featured

release-news.com Webutation